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Synzen antennas and Next Big Thing join on IoT GNSS platform

February 10, 2022  - By

Antenna company Synzen Precision Technology has teamed up with Next Big Thing AG (NBT) to produce the sensor-based LTE-M/NB-IoT development platform Prometheus, which promises fast cellular internet of things (IoT) prototyping.

The PROXIMA GNSS antenna will be part of the Prometheus platform. (Photo: Synzen Precision Technology)

The PROXIMA GNSS antenna will be part of the Prometheus platform. (Photo: Synzen Precision Technology)

Prometheus is an IoT sensor-based development platform designed to simplify prototyping and speed time to market for developers of IoT and cloud-based solutions. The latest platform showcases Synzen’s expertise in GNSS and LTE 4G antenna solutions when combined with the Nordic nRF9160 module.

The building blocks enabling the mobility and IoT revolution are “always-on” connected 4G cellular and accurate and reliable GNSS solutions, regardless of the operating environment, Synzen said. Prometheus provides 4G connectivity combined with high-performance GNSS positioning solutions.

For the Prometheus platform, NBT chose the low-power FR4 active GNSS solution. “The selection of our latest PROXIMA low-power active solution in an FR4 package helped enable a fully certified solution optimized for low power consumption over the full industrial temperature range of –40 to +85 degrees centigrade,” said Chris Tomlin, Synzen technical director.

The PROXIMA GNSS SMD active antenna includes an amplifying front end to boost the signal as well as provide out-of-band filtering to prevent receiver saturation.

About the Author:


Senior Editor Tracy Cozzens joined GPS World magazine in 2006. She also is editor of GPS World’s newsletters and the sister website Geospatial Solutions. She has worked in government, for non-profits, and in corporate communications, editing a variety of publications for audiences ranging from federal government contractors to teachers.

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