About Richard B. Langley

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Richard B. Langley is a professor in the Department of Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) in Fredericton, Canada, where he has been teaching and conducting research since 1981. He has a B.Sc. in applied physics from the University of Waterloo and a Ph.D. in experimental space science from York University, Toronto. He spent two years at MIT as a postdoctoral fellow, researching geodetic applications of lunar laser ranging and VLBI. For work in VLBI, he shared two NASA Group Achievement Awards.

Professor Langley has worked extensively with the Global Positioning System. He has been active in the development of GPS error models since the early 1980s and is a co-author of the venerable “Guide to GPS Positioning” and a columnist and contributing editor of GPS World magazine. His research team is currently working on a number of GPS-related projects, including the study of atmospheric effects on wide-area augmentation systems, the adaptation of techniques for spaceborne GPS, and the development of GPS-based systems for machine control and deformation monitoring. Professor Langley is a collaborator in UNB’s Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network project and is the principal investigator for the GPS instrument on the Canadian CASSIOPE research satellite now in orbit.

Professor Langley is a fellow of The Institute of Navigation (ION), the Royal Institute of Navigation, and the International Association of Geodesy. He shared the ION 2003 Burka Award with Don Kim and received the ION’s Johannes Kepler Award in 2007.

Posts by Richard B. Langley

Innovation: Low-cost single-frequency positioning in urban environments Posted on 09 May 2018 in the Featured Stories & Innovation categories.

Making It Better
Real-world tests show improved single-frequency GNSS positioning in urban environments using GLONASS alongside GPS, as well as the effect of different antennas and adaptive weighting of observations. Results? Single-frequency accuracies below one meter. Read more»

Innovation: QZS-3 and QZS-4 join the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Posted on 09 Feb 2018 in the From the Magazine & GNSS & Innovation categories.

Constellation completed
The first, or prototype, Block I QZSS satellite was launched in 2010 and, based on the positive test results from this satellite, an additional three satellites were launched in 2017, completing a four-satellite constellation. In this month’s column, we examine the recent developments of this unique and innovative navigation system. Read more»

Innovation: GLONASS — past, present and future Posted on 01 Nov 2017 in the From the Magazine & GNSS & Innovation categories.

A review the history of the GLONASS program, its current status, and an overview the plans for the immediate future of the satellite constellation, its navigation signals and the ground support network. Read more»

GPS ‘sees’ the Great American Eclipse Posted on 25 Aug 2017 in the Featured Stories & GNSS categories.

The eclipse across America on Aug. 21 was not only a magnificent visual event, it was also observed indirectly by the impact that it had on the propagation of radio... Read more»

QZS-2 signal analysis, QZS-3 launched Posted on 23 Aug 2017 in the GNSS & Opinions categories.

This month we bring you a guest column by Steffen Thoelert, André Hauschild, Peter Steigenberger and Oliver Montenbruck of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and Richard B. Langley of the... Read more»

Innovation: Evolutionary and revolutionary Posted on 11 Jul 2016 in the From the Magazine & Innovation & OEM categories.

The development and performance of the VeraPhase GNSS antenna
We take a look at a revolutionary design of a multi-frequency multi-GNSS antenna. Our authors discuss how the antenna evolved from a research project in academia to a commercial product about to enter the market. Read more»

Innovation: There’s an app for that Posted on 13 Jun 2016 in the Featured Stories & From the Magazine & Innovation categories.

Using a smartphone for GNSS ionospheric data collection
In this month’s column, we take a look at the use of a smartphone app to collect GNSS ionospheric data. The authors' app-centric approach provides a software framework and output format that remain the same for different receivers. Read more»

Innovation: Quo vademus Posted on 03 May 2016 in the From the Magazine & Innovation categories.

Future automotive GNSS positioning in urban scenarios
Driving in built-up areas, buildings can block the signals from GPS satellites. But if the receiver can access the signals of two or more GNSSs, position fixes might be available where none were possible with GPS alone, and the accuracies of marginal fixes might be improved. The authors look at using multi-GNSS for navigating in the heart of a city and how the additional signals can help us to get where we’re going. Read more»