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Where is that spoofed signal coming from?

February 7, 2018  - By
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An experiment in an anechoic chamber with a JAVAD GNSS TRIUMPH-LS shows the approximate orientation of the spoofer (at 283° azimuth.)

Javad GNSS advises that with its equipment it is possible, when a spoofer is detected in the area, to identify the direction from which the spoofing signals are coming.

Hold the receiver antenna horizontally and rotate it slowly (one rotation in 30 seconds) to determine the angle at which satellite energies become minimum.

The spoofer’s direction lies behind the null point of the antenna reception pattern.

An experiment in an anechoic chamber with a Javad GNSS Triumph-LS shows the approximate orientation of the spoofer (at 283 degree azimuth.)

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About the Author:


Senior Editor Tracy Cozzens joined GPS World magazine in 2006. She also is editor of GPS World’s newsletters and the sister website Geospatial Solutions. She has worked in government, for non-profits, and in corporate communications, editing a variety of publications for audiences ranging from federal government contractors to teachers.

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