Your behavior appears to be a little unusual. Please verify that you are not a bot.


Seen & Heard: Tracking pythons and wild camels

May 2, 2023  - By

“Seen & Heard” is a monthly feature of GPS World magazine, traveling the world to capture interesting and unusual news stories involving the GNSS/PNT industry.


Image: Apple

Image: Apple

Apple Products Meet Accuracy with GPS

Apple launched the Ultra Watch, which contains a dual-frequency GPS antenna that can receive L5 signals, as well as the iPhone 14, which features a dual-band GPS receiver combining the L1 and L5 signals. The company is also harnessing signals from more than 70 satellites to boost the accuracy of its services such as SOS alerts and alerting emergency responders, per The National News. The dual-frequency abilities of the new products provide accurate location for calculating distance, pace and routes. The L5 signals also are a critical component of Apple’s health and safety features, providing more accuracy than in previous products.


Image: dwi septiyana/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Image: dwi septiyana/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Collar Accidently Tracks Python

Wildlife researchers in Key Largo, Florida, accidently discovered a way to locate and eradicate invasive Burmese pythons, per WFLA News Channel 8. The team of researchers were observing racoons and possums that were fitted with tracking collars to note their behavior. After months of observation, a possum collar sent a mortality signal due to lack of movement. To the researchers’ surprise, the collar then started moving again. They later discovered the possum had been eaten by a python. While this was not the intent of the team’s research, they proved this could be an effective way to lower the increasing population of the invasive python species.


Image: Pavliha/ iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Image: Pavliha/ iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Remote-Sensing Finds Wild Camels

Scientist Liu Shaochuang and his team have used satellite remote-sensing technology to study and track wild camels. Shaochuang studies the interrelationship between endangered animals and their environments, which may help protect the species against climate change. To track a camel, Shaochuang attaches a GNSS-enabled collar, which transmits the camel’s location every day. The short message function is provided by China’s BeiDou satellite system, which transmits and receives signals in real time. Based on the data, Shaochuang and his team can observe migratory paths, living environments and possible threats.


Image: Screenshot of CNN video

Image: Screenshot of CNN video

Former South Carolina Attorney Convicted with Location Data

On March 3, Alex Murdaugh was convicted of killing his son Paul Murdaugh and wife Maggie Murdaugh. With limited evidence, the prosecution used a phone video and vehicle navigation data to prove Alex’s guilt. During the trial, Alex claimed he was visiting his mother during the time the murders took place. However, General Motors OnStar data accessed by investigators from his Chevrolet Suburban contradicted the alibi, putting Alex at the scene of the crime during the time of the murders. Plus, in a smartphone video taken by Paul that night, Alex’s voice could be heard, placing him at the scene.

About the Author: Maddie Saines

Maddie was a managing editor at GPS World.