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Aftermath of the Türkiye Earthquakes

April 25, 2023  - By
Image: Judy Dillon/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Image: Judy Dillon/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

The Mw 7.8 and Mw 7.5 Kahramanmaraş Earthquake Sequence struck near Nurdağı, Türkiye, on Feb. 6. It collapsed several buildings and has claimed more than 50,000 lives. The impact of the initial earthquakes was very severe, but to make matters worse, later in February, a Mw 6.4 tremor struck near Antakya, a city near Türkiye’s border with Syria. This created further damage to infrastructure and claimed more victims.

Image: Screenshot of video from NBC News

Image: Screenshot of video from NBC News

The Specifics

The United States Geological Survey reports that the earthquake resulted from strike-slip faulting at shallow depths. The earthquake sequence displaced numerous fault segments within the East Anatolian Fault zone. Early estimates indicate about 185 miles of fault length ruptured. Parts of the North Anatolian Fault shifted 10 feet, while segments of the East Anatolian Fault slid more than 30 feet.

Historic Site Suffers

Gaziantep Castle dates back to the second millennium B.C. It has been used in many capacities throughout history, and more recently, stood as a museum for visitors to learn about its rich history. The castle was reduced to rubble in the earthquake. Other historical sites that sustained damage include the Yeni Mosque and the ancient city of Aleppo in Syria.

Image: Screenshot of CNN video

Image: Screenshot of CNN video

Earth Opens Up

The earthquake destroyed cities all over Türkiye and northern Syria, but they are not the only areas that suffered dramatic effects. A verdant olive grove in Tepehan, Hatay Province, Türkiye, was completely divided when the ground split, creating a 984-foot-long valley in the middle of the grove. The valley is more than 130 feet deep and has created issues for the 7,000 people that inhabit the area.

About the Author: Maddie Saines

Maddie was a managing editor at GPS World.