ADS-B Out compliance delayed for Canadian pilots

October 29, 2019  - By
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A cockpit equipped with ADS-B controls. (Photo: FAA)

A cockpit equipped with ADS-B controls. (Photo: FAA)

Canada will be delaying the implementation dates for Phases 1 and 2 of its ADS-B Out Performance Requirements Mandate, according to a report by the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association.

ADS-B stands for Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast. Deadline for aircraft in the United States to be equipped with ADS-B Out capability is Jan. 1, 2020.

The original deadline for implementation in Canada was set for Feb. 25, 2021, for Phase 1-Class A airspace and Class E airspace above FL600, and Jan. 27, 2022 (Phase 2-Class B airspace).

Because numerous industry operators have stated they will not be able to meet those deadlines, new Phase 1 and 2 implementation dates will be set.

Transport Canada-Civil Aviation (TCCA) has also stated that some regulatory matters must be dealt with before implementation can take place.

There is no word yet on how this might affect the implementation of remaining phases — C, D and E), according to the report. Nav Canada’s performance requirements mandate document states that implementation of the different phases will be a minimum of one year apart.

ADS-B Out. ADS-B Out broadcasts information about an aircraft’s GPS location, altitude, ground speed and other data to ground stations and other aircraft once per second.

Air traffic controllers and aircraft equipped with ADS-B In can immediately receive this information.

Tbe ADS-B offers more precise tracking of aircraft compared to radar technology, which sweeps for position information every 5 to 12 seconds.

About the Author:


Tracy Cozzens has served as managing editor of GPS World magazine since 2006, and also is editor of GPS World’s sister website, Geospatial Solutions. She has worked in government, for non-profits, and in corporate communications, editing a variety of publications for audiences ranging from federal government contractors to teachers.

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